Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52Sgt. Ballenger and Officer Jordan Williams surprised Powell in September with the department’s Citizen’s Award following a morning broadcast. Co-winner, photojournalist Mark Lyon, was on assignment and also received a plaque. When you start targeting such a broad audience, you never realize how many people you’re going to touch. “We did a live studio broadcast at WYFF and I did the morning traf- fic report. The response to that was great, I think, because people like the positive messages. If it bleeds it leads isn’t really the case here. That’s a credit to WYFF because I don’t know of any other news outlet that has been able to do something like this so successfully.” Technology has helped the se- ries gain a following. While sim- ulating a traffic stop in which the driver – a concealed weapon permit holder – had a gun in his glove com- partment, Powell logged into Face- book Live and fielded questions from more than 200 online fans across the country. “They were able to feel face to face with officers and answer any questions they may have about be- ing a weapon holder safely, for both sides of the situation. Viewers really liked that,” she said. It was also popular with the of- ficers who taped the segment. “It’s immediate. Facebook Live provides a unique forum because we’re able to field questions right there as segments are being record- ed,” Ballenger said. “It’s like being able to drive here and walk into our lobby to ask a question, but they can do it through technology from their home or work. If that isn’t the most proactive policing in South Caroli- na I don’t know what is.” It also helps, Ballenger said, for viewers to see the department’s professionally-trained K9 officers, state-of-the-art radar, highly accu- rate tracking and reporting tools and interactive training simulator. “We’ve really been able to highlight how advanced much of the technology we have is and how we’re able to use it,” he said. “We’ve gotten a lot of feedback from people who said they had no idea we have the capabilities that we do. Local taxpayers see a huge return on their investment and people outside the city looking for somewhere to move see the City of Greer as that shining pinnacle on the hill – a place they may want to move.” Powell said she receives phone calls or e-mails from viewers who miss a weekly 4 Your Safety seg- ment, wanting to know if they can find it on the station’s website. “Oftentimes, we don’t have very much response unless we do something wrong, so it tells us that they are appreciating the series,” she said. So how long can a series like 4 Your Safety run? Ballenger said as long as the messages remain rel- evant, producers stay happy and viewers are pleased, the city will re- main committed to the series. “FOXCarolina has approached us about doing a similar series, which opens access to a differ- ent audience and a different age group,” Ballenger said. “We’d be open to doing that once we end the series with WYFF, so the messaging campaign may continue in another form.” “ If it bleeds it leads isn’t really the case here. That’s a credit to WYFF because I don’t know of any other news outlet that has been able to do something like this so successfully.” 25