Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 5235 When the City of Greer has surplus equipment or vehicles, those items often are posted on the surplus auction site GovDeals. A 1991 Sutphen Pumper Truck that no longer met the rated capacity for pumping proved much more valu- able when it was retired from the GFD fleet. “Given that we didn’t rely on that truck and its pumping capacity for ISO rating and its age, I couldn’t recommend that we put a lot of money into it,” Greer Fire Chief Dorian Flowers said. “Honestly, if we had gotten to the point that we needed to use the truck for pumping we wouldn’t do it. We would call our partners to have them come in and help us or borrow one of their trucks.” Woodruff Fire Chief Wade Godfrey contacted Flowers with interest in the truck because of its hard top on the crew cab area. “The reason the chief made the request is because he still needs to get per- sonnel from his station to an incident.”Flowers said. “It provides a safer riding position for his firefighters because it has a hard top and a fully enclosed cab.” At the same time, a request also arrived from the Bonds Career Center Firefighting Program, a recent addition to the center’s offerings under instructor and former Greer Fire Chief Chris Harvey. GFD partners with the program to help the next generation of firefighters earn their National Fire Protection Association Firefighter 1 and 2 Certifications before their senior year of high school. Woodruff, which had a newer model surplus pumper, agreed to gift its truck to the Bonds Center program for training in exchange for the Greer truck. In- trigued by the opportunity to help another city and an educational program, Greer City Council approved the action in February and it has proven to be a win for all involved. “The pumper has given us the ability to teach so many hands on scenarios, such as laying a supply line from a hydrant, flowing attack lines and the ability to flow firefighting foam, just to mention a few,” Harvey said. “By having the pump- er in-house we do not have to rely on Greer FD to bring us a pumper multiple times a year. “These young men and women are really enthused about the opportunities that the fire service will get them. They are already looking at how the fire service and Greenville Tech can help them obtain their associates and bachelor degrees.” Bonds Center students under Chris Harvey (inset) train on a pumper truck. GFD helps train the next generation 2016 Alarms by Incident Type Rescue/Medical..............63% Service Call....................11% Good Intent.................... 9% False Alarm.................... 8% Fire................................. 5% Other.............................. 4% Fire Marshal’s Report Inspections..................... 913 Violations....................... 664 Violations Corrected..... 510 Fires Investigated.......... 16 Car Seat Inspections..... 208 Smoke Detectors Installed.......................... 372 Plan Reviews.................. 134 Battalion Chief Chuck McConnell. has been a partic- ipating member of the Greenville County Fire Chief’s Honor Guard since 2000. He represents Greer and Greenville County all over the state. Cunningham was honored in March at the Fifth Annual Greer CPW Public Safety Dinner, taking home the Public Safety Professional of the Year Award for the fire department. McConnell earns Public Safety honor